Feature Stories

24
Feb

Honoring Dr William D Dar

In recognition of Dr William Dar’s 15 years of service and vision of inclusive market oriented development to serve smallholder farmers in semi-arid tropics, the ICRISAT-Agriculture Innovation Platform (AIP) building...
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24
Feb

Helping chickpea farmers meet climate change

A new project to improve chickpea adaptation to environmental challenges was recently launched at ICRISAT – India. The primary focus is: salinity tolerance, ascochyta blight resistance and drought tolerance. Chickpea production...
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ICRISAT 44th Annual Day

“Pushing our thinking towards market oriented development that is inclusive for small holder farmers does not happen just because of science, it happens because of people. People working together with their skills, perspectives and insights to transform science to innovation that serves society. Today we are celebrating all of you, in your different capacities, contributing to the mission of ICRISAT.” Dr David Bergvinson, Director General ICRISAT.

New publications

Identification and Comparative Analysis of Differential Gene Expression in Soybean Leaf Tissue under Drought and Flooding Stress Revealed by RNA-Seq

Authors: Chen W, Yao Q, Patil GB, Agarwal G, Deshmukh RK, Lin L, Wang B, Wang Y, Prince SJ, Song L, Xu D, An YC, Valliyodan B, Varshney RK and Nguyen HT

Published: 2016, Frontiers in Plant Science, 07 (1044): 01-19. ISSN 1664-462X

Abstract: In this study, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) under drought and flooding conditions were investigated using Illumina RNA-Seq transcriptome profiling. A total of 2724 and 3498 DEGs were identified under drought and flooding treatments, respectively. These genes comprise 289 Transcription Factors (TFs) representing Basic Helix-loop Helix (bHLH), Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs), myeloblastosis (MYB), No apical meristem (NAC), and WRKY amino acid motif (WRKY) type major families known to be involved in the mechanism of stress tolerance.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9587/

Genetic diversity of stay-green sorghums and their derivatives revealed by microsatellites

Authors: Galyuon IKA, Madhusudhana R, Borrell AK, Hash CT and Howarth CJ

Published: 2016, African Journal of Biotechnology, 15 (25):1363-1374. ISSN 1684-5315

Abstract: The genetic variability of 28 sorghum genotypes of known senescence phenotype was investigated using 66 SSR markers well-distributed across the sorghum genome. The genotypes of a number of lines from breeding programmes for stay-green were also determined. This included lines selected phenotypically for stay-green and also RSG 03123, a marker-assisted backcross progeny of R16 (recurrent parent) and B35 (stay-green donor).

http://oar.icrisat.org/9588/

Contribution of previous legumes to soil fertility and millet yields in West African Sahel

Authors: Sangare G, Doka DI, Barrage M and Fatondji D

Published: 2016, African Journal of Agricultural Research, 11 (28). pp. 2486-2498. ISSN 1991-637X

Abstract: Studies on combined effects of 4 legume crops residues and rock phosphate application on pearl millet yield were undertaken on sandy acid soil field from 2012 to 2015 at ICRISAT Sahelian center (ISC)-Sadore, Niger. The objective of the experiment was to assess the best combination of legume species x rate of crop residue x rock phosphate doses that can sustainably improve pearl millet yield in cereal monoculture system with a low input cost and minimum soil tillage.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9589/

Farmer Participatory Early-Generation Yield Testing of Sorghum in West Africa: Possibilities to Optimize Genetic Gains for Yield in Farmers’ Fields

Authors: Rattunde HFW, Michel S, Leiser WL, Piepho HP, Diallo C, Brocke Kv, Diallo B, Haussmann BIG and Weltzien E

Published: 2016, Crop Science, 56 (5). pp. 2493-2505. ISSN 0011-183X

Abstract: The effectiveness of on-farm and/or on-station early generation yield testing was examined to maximize the genetic gains for sorghum yield under smallholder famer production conditions in West Africa. On-farm first-stage yield trials (augmented design, 150 genotypes with subsets of 50 genotypes tested per farmer) and second-stage yield trials (replicated α-lattice design, 21 test genotypes) were conducted, as well as on-station α-lattice first- and second-stage trials under contrasting phosphorous conditions. On-farm testing was effective, with yield showing significant genetic variance and acceptable heritabilities (0.56 in first- and 0.61 to 0.83 in second-stage trials).

http://oar.icrisat.org/9590/

Comparative evaluation of protein content in groundnut samples by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy and Skalar colorimetric methods

Authors: Chaudhury S, Sahrawat KL, Srinivasu K, Wani SP and Puppala N

Published: 2016, Current Science, 110 (12):2219-2220. ISSN 0011-3891

Abstract: The objectives of this study were to estimate and compare the relative efficacy of the near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) method, with that of a conventional colorimetric method, following digestion of ground samples, using Skalar autoanalyser for determining protein in groundnut samples. The NIRS based method provides an automated measurement and has the potential to become a valuable tool for providing analytical support for agricultural research

http://oar.icrisat.org/9596/

No-tillage lessens soil CO2 emissions the most under arid and sandy soil conditions: results from a meta-analysis

Authors: Abdalla K, Chivenge P, Ciais P and Chaplot V

Published: 2016, Biogeosciences, 13: 3619-3633. ISSN 1726-4170

Abstract: A meta-analysis was conducted using 46 peer-reviewed publications totaling 174 paired observations comparing CO2 emissions over entire seasons or years from tilled and untilled soils across different climates, crop types and soil conditions with the objective of quantifying tillage impact on CO2 emissions and assessing the main controls.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9597/

The evolution of photoperiod-insensitive flowering in sorghum, a genomic model for panicoid grasses

Authors: Cuevas HE, Zhou C, Tang H, Khadke PP, Das S, Lin YR, Ge Z, Clemente T, Upadhyaya HD, Hash CT and Paterson AW

Published: 2016, Molecular Biology and Evolution, 33 (09):2417-2428. ISSN 0737-4038

Abstract: A cross between tropical and temperate sorghums [Sorghum propinquum (Kunth) Hitchc. x S. bicolor (L.) Moench], revealed a quantitative trait locus, FlrAvgD1, accounting for 85.7% of variation in flowering time under long days. Fine-scale genetic mapping placed FlrAvgD1 on chromosome 6 within the physically largest centiMorgan in the genome. Forward genetic data from ‘converted’ sorghums validated the QTL. Association genetic evidence from a diversity panel delineated the QTL to a 10 kb interval containing only one annotated gene, Sb06g012260, that was shown by reverse genetics to complement a recessive allele.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9598/

Do participatory scenario exercises promote systems thinking and build consensus?

Authors: Olabisi LS, Adebiyi J, Traoré PS and Kakwera KN

Published: 2016, Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene, 04 (000113): 01-11. ISSN 2325-1026

Abstract: Participatory scenario processes are associated with positive social learning outcomes, including consensus-building and shifts toward more systemic thinking. However, these claims have not been assessed quantitatively in diverse cultural and socio-ecological settings. We convened three stakeholder workshops around the future of agricultural development and rural livelihoods in Burkina Faso, Nigeria, and Malawi, using a participatory scenario generation process to examine proposed research and action priorities under conditions of uncertainty. We administered pre- and post-workshop surveys, and used a paired t-test to assess how stakeholders’ rankings of research priorities changed after participating in the scenario visioning exercise.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9599/

Agronomic management options for sustaining chickpea yield under climate change scenario

Authors: Kadiyala MDM, Kumara Charyulu D, Nedumaran S, Moses Shyam D, Gumma MK and Bantilan MCS

Published: 2016, Journal of Agrometeorology, 18 (01): 41-47. ISSN 0972 – 1665

Abstract: The impact of future climate change on the chickpea productivity was studied using the sequence analysis tool of DSSAT V 4.5 to simulate fallow-chickpea rotation at four locations viz Anantapur, Kurnool, Kadapa and Prakasam of Andhra Pradesh State. The results indicated that as compared to baseline climate, the climate change to be anticipated by 2069 (Mid –century period) would decrease the yield of chickpea by 4.3 to 18.6 per cent across various locations tested.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9604/ 

Comprehensive tissue-specific proteome analysis of drought stress responses in Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br. (Pearl millet)

Authors: Ghatak A, Chaturvedi P, Nagler M, Roustan V, Lyon D, Bachmann G, Postl W, Schröfl A, Desai N, Varshney RK and Weckwerth W

Published: 2016, Journal of Proteomics, 143: 122-135. ISSN 1876-7737

Abstract: We have used a shotgun proteomics approach to investigate protein signatures from different tissues under drought and control conditions. Drought stressed plants showed significant changes in stomatal conductance and increased root growth compared to the control plants. Root, leaf and seed tissues were harvested and 2281 proteins were identified and quantified in total. Leaf tissue showed the largest number of significant changes (120), followed by roots (25) and seeds (10). Increased levels of root proteins involved in cell wall-, lipid-, secondary- and signaling metabolism and the concomitantly observed increased root length point to an impaired shoot–root communication under drought stress.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9605/

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2014

Dec:  05 12 19 26
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Oct:  01 10 17 24 31
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Aug:  01 08 14 22 28
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2013

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Aug:  02 08 16 23 30
July:  05 12 19 26
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2012

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Aug:  03 10 17 24 31
July:  06 13 20 27
Jun:  01 08 15 22 29
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2011

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2010

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2009

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