Feature Story

 

 

ICRISAT in Global News

Breaking legume’s crop wild relative barrier

 

 

 

Domesticating crops for traits like higher yields is not without risks. Over time, domesticated varieties can lose other important traits that make them resilient to biotic and abiotic stresses. In a new study, scientists from ICRISAT report progress in transferring disease and stress resistance traits from wild relatives of several legumes to their domesticated varieties.

 

 

Biotechnology does not mean only GM crops

 

 

Biotechnology covers a range of low to high-end technologies important for the prosperity and nutritional security of developing countries. However, public perception remains focused on genetically modified (GM) crops. Dr Rajeev K Varshney of ICRISAT highlights how scientists and policy makers need to focus on the benefits of these technologies for smallholder farmers and communicate better for effective adoption.

 

ICRISAT introduces new groundnut varieties in northern Ghana

 

 

ICRISAT introduced three high yielding groundnut varieties in Ghana with the aim to better farmers’ income, nutrition and health status. The project, funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) through its Feed the Future program, will enhance farmers’ knowledge on improved groundnut production technologies and complementary crop management practices, and reach 170,000 direct beneficiaries and 250,000 indirect beneficiaries across the six districts covered. .

 

Meeting & Workshop

Our newsletter now has a new logo!

Why 3d?

ICRISAT’s research is three dimensional, looking holistically at how to improve the lives of drylands farmers. The three ‘d’s also represent our Institute tagline:discovery to delivery for the drylands
. The new name reflects how the newsletter is about the bigger picture, sharing how ICRISAT works with partners to address the global challenges of poverty, hunger, malnutrition and environmental degradation.The ‘germinating seed’ symbolizes interconnection between discovery and
delivery, showing our goal to make the drylands more productive and resilient.

 

 

New Publications

Weed growth and crop yield responses to tillage and mulching under different crop rotation sequences in semi-arid conditions

Authors:  Mashingaidze N, Twomlow S, Madakadze IC, Mupangwa W, Mavunganidze Z and Goss M

Published: 2017, Soil Use and Management, 33 (2). pp. 311-327. ISSN 02660032

Abstract: Conservation agriculture (CA) is thought to reduce weed pressure from the third year of adoption, when recommended practices are followed. Weed growth and crop yield were assessed during the third and fourth year of maize–cowpea–sorghum rotation, second and third year of maize–cowpea rotation and first and second year of maize monocropping on clay loam soils at Matopos Research Station (annual rainfall, 573 mm) following recommended CA management practices. Each experiment had a split-plot randomized complete block design with mouldboard plough (CONV), minimum tillage (MT) with ripper tine and planting basins as main-plot factor and maize residue mulch rate (0, 2 and 4 t/ha) as a subplot factor, with threefold replication. All subplots were surface mulched and weeded by hoe at the same time. Minimum tillage increased weed growth in 2nd year of maize monocropping. Under the maize–cowpea rotation, the considerable weed growth in planting basins was likely due to the large intra-row spacing and poor light competitiveness of the cowpea variety.

http://oar.icrisat.org/10081/

Molecular mapping of flowering time major genes and QTLs in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

Authors:   Mallikarjuna BP, Samineni S, Thudi M, Sajja SB, Khan AW, Patil A, Viswanatha KP, Varshney RK and Gaur PM

Published: 2017, Frontiers in Plant Science, 8 (1140). pp. 1-10. ISSN 1664-462X

Abstract: This study was conducted for molecular mapping of genes/quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling flowering time in chickpea using F2 populations derived from four crosses (ICCV 96029 × CDC Frontier, ICC 5810 × CDC Frontier, BGD 132 × CDC Frontier and ICC 16641 × CDC Frontier). Genetic studies revealed monogenic control of flowering time in the crosses ICCV 96029 × CDC Frontier, BGD 132 × CDC Frontier and ICC 16641 × CDC Frontier, and digenic control with complementary gene action in ICC 5810 × CDC Frontier. The intraspecific genetic maps developed from these crosses consisted of 75, 75, 68 and 67 markers spanning 248.8 cM, 331.4 cM, 311.1 cM and 385.1 cM, respectively. A consensus map spanning 363.8 cM with 109 loci was constructed by integrating four genetic maps. Major QTLs corresponding to flowering time genes efl-1 from ICCV 96029, efl-3 from BGD 132 and efl-4 from ICC 16641 were mapped on CaLG04, CaLG08 and CaLG06, respectively.

http://oar.icrisat.org/10082/

Co-learning cycles to support the design of innovative farm systems in southern Mali

Authors:  Falconnier GN, Descheemaeker K, Van Mourik TA, Adam M, Sogoba B and Giller KE

Published: 2017, European Journal of Agronomy, 89. pp. 61-74. ISSN 11610301

Abstract: Farm systems were re-designed together with farmers during three years (2013–2015) in Southern Mali to improve income without compromising food self-sufficiency. A cyclical learning model with three steps was used. Two iterations of the cycle were performed. We worked with 132 farmers representing four farm types: High Resource Endowed with Large Herd (HRE-LH); High Resource Endowed (HRE); Medium Resource Endowed (MRE) and Low Resource Endowed (LRE) farms. Without compromising food self-sufficiency, maize/cowpea intercropping in the right niche combined with stall feeding increased HRE-LH and HRE farm gross margin by 20–26% respectively (i.e. 690 and 545 US$ year−1) with respect to the current farm system. Replacement of sorghum by soyabean (or cowpea) increased MRE and LRE farm gross margin by 29 and 9% respectively (i.e. 545 and 32 US$ year−1). 

http://oar.icrisat.org/10087/

Improving agricultural knowledge management: The AgTrials experience

Authors:  Hyman G, Espinosa H, Camargo P, Abreu D, Devare M, Arnaud E, Porter C, Mwanzia L, Sonder K and Traore S

Published: 2017, F1000Research, 6 (317). pp. 1-13. ISSN 2046-1402

Abstract: This paper reports on the experience of the AgTrials initiative, an effort to build an online database of agricultural trials applying principles of interoperability and open access. The study revealed barriers to participation and impediments to interaction, opportunities for improving agricultural knowledge management and a large potential for the use of trial and evaluation data. It was concluded that technical and logistical mechanisms for developing interoperable online databases are well advanced. More effort will be needed to advance organizational and institutional work for these types of databases to realize their potential.

http://oar.icrisat.org/10088/

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