Feature Stories

17
Feb

Promoting quality science through interdisciplinary research

During the biennial planning session of ICRISAT’s senior scientists, Dr David Bergvinson, Director General, ICRISAT, said, “One of the challenges is how can we bring different disciplines and programs together to develop integrated multidisciplinary proposals as a key step in...
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17
Feb

A step towards seed conservation in Africa

A team from ICRISAT-Niamey genebank, visited a community-led seed bank in Tougouri village. This seed bank is first of its kind in Burkina Faso. During the visit, the team interacted with farmers and expressed interest in collaborating with the seed...
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New publications

QTL-seq for rapid identification of candidate genes for 100-seed weight and root/total plant dry weight ratio under rainfed conditions in chickpea

Authors: Singh VK, Khan AW, Jaganathan D, Thudi M, Roorkiwal M, Takagi H, Garg V, Kumar V, Chitikineni A, Gaur PM, Sutton T, Terauchi R,  and Varshney RK

Published: 2016, Plant Biotechnology Journal. pp. 2110-2119. ISSN 1467-7644

Abstract: QTL-seq approach, was used to identify candidate genomic regions for 100-seed weight (100SDW) and total dry root weight to total plant dry weight ratio (RTR) under rainfed conditions. Genomewide SNP profiling of extreme phenotypic bulks from the ICC 4958 × ICC 1882 population identified two significant genomic regions, one on CaLG01 (1.08 Mb) and another on CaLG04 (2.7 Mb) linkage groups for 100SDW. Similarly, one significant genomic region on CaLG04 (1.10 Mb) was identified for RTR.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9544/

Introgression of striga resistance into popular Sudanese sorghum varieties using marker assisted selection

Authors: Ali R, Hash CT, Damris O, Elhussein A and Mohamed AH

Published: 2016, World Journal of Biotechnology, 01 (01): 48-55. ISSN 2518-0878

Abstract: We used molecular marker-assisted backcrossing to introgress Striga resistance from a resistant genotype, N13, into agronomically important genetic backgrounds (Tabat, Wad and Ahmed). Backcross populations BC3S3 were generated and genotyped using Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) and Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) markers. A total of 17 promising backcross progenies were selected and screened in Striga infested field alongside their parents.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9551/

Plant Growth Promoting Actinobacteria: A New Avenue for Enhancing the Productivity and Soil Fertility of Grain Legumes

Authors: Gopalakrishnan S, Sathya A and Vijayabharathi R

Published: 2016, Springer, Singapore. ISBN 978-981-10-0705-7

Abstract: Actinomycetes are bacteria that play an important role in PGP and plant protection, produce secondary metabolites of commercial interest, and their use is well documented in wheat, rice, beans, chickpeas and peas. In order to promote legumes, the general assembly of the UN recently declared 2016 the “International Year of Pulses.” In view of this development, this book illustrates how PGP actinomycetes can improve grain yield and soil fertility, improve control of insect pests and phytopathogens, and enhance host-plant resistance.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9545/

Use of Genomic Approaches in Understanding the Role of Actinomycetes as PGP in Grain Legumes

Authors: Sharma M, Tarafdar A and Ghosh R

Published: 2016, Plant Growth Promoting Actinobacteria: A New Avenue for Enhancing the Productivity and Soil Fertility of Grain Legumes. Springer, Singapore, pp. 249-262. ISBN 978-981-10-0705-7

Abstract: In agriculture, actinomycetes are used as biocontrol agents against some pests and pathogenic organisms as well as plant growth-promoting (PGP) agents for crops. Use of different molecular methods, e.g., metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, genetic fingerprinting, proteogenomics, and metaproteomics, are more significant for classifying and discovering the immense diversity in microbial population and for understanding their interactions with other abiotic and biotic environmental elements. The opportunity of accessing inexpensive sequencing techniques has led to the assemblies of copious genomic data for actinomycetes, such as Streptomyces and related species, with the goal of discovering novel bioactive metabolic and their utility as PGP; however, the use of actinomycetes in agriculture using genomic approaches is in its initial stages.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9546/

Socio-economic and Agricultural Vulnerability across Districts of Karnataka

Authors: Raju KV, Deshpande RS and Satyasiba B

Published: 2016, Climate Change Challenge (3C) and Social-Economic-Ecological Interface-Building: Exploring Potential Adaptation Strategies for Bio-resource Conservation and Livelihood Development. Environmental Science and Engineering, Part 2. Springer International Publishing, Switzerland, pp. 161-190. ISBN 978-3-319-31013-8

Abstract: The current paper attempts to build a picture of the socio-economic context of vulnerability by focusing on indicators that measure both the state of development of the people as well as its capacity to progress further. The result of agricultural vulnerability index suggests indicators like cropping intensity, gross irrigated area and commercial crop area that are the major drivers in determining the vulnerability of districts of Karnataka. The socio-economic index depicts indicators like per capital income, population density and percentage of literacy rate that are the major drivers and contribute to the overall livelihood vulnerability of districts.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9552/

Quantifying household vulnerability triggered by drought: evidence from rural India

Authors: Sam AS, Kumar R, Kächele H and Müller K 

Published: 2016, Climate and Development. 01-16. ISSN 1756-5529

Abstract: The objective of this paper is to quantify the livelihood and socio-economic vulnerability of rural households that are affected by drought in rural India. The Livelihood Vulnerability Index and Socioeconomic Vulnerability Index were applied to analyse the vulnerability of rural households. A sample size of 157 rural households from the state of Odisha in India was surveyed in 2015. Socio-demographic characteristics such as low literacy rates, high dependency ratios and weak housing structures make people more vulnerable, whereas access to social networks plays a significant role in supporting poor rural households.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9581/

Differential Induction of Flavonoids in Groundnut in Response to Helicoverpa armigera and Aphis craccivora Infestation

Authors: War AR, Sharma SP and Sharma HC

Published: 2016, International Journal of Insect Science, 08. pp. 55-64. ISSN 1179-5433

Abstract: High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fingerprinting of phenols of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) plants with differential levels of resistance was carried out in response to Helicoverpa armigera (chewing insect) and Aphis craccivora (sucking pest) infestation. The genotypes used were ICGV 86699, ICGV 86031, ICG 2271 (NCAc 343), ICG 1697 (NCAc 17090), and JL 24. Most of the identified compounds were present in H. armigera- and A. craccivora-infested plants of ICGV 86699.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9582/

Incidence of arthropod pests and diseases of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) in northern Ghana

Authors: Tanzubil PB

Published: 2016, Journal of Entomology and Zoology Studies, 04 (04): 29-32. ISSN 2320-7078

Abstract: Combinations of farmer interviews and direct field sampling were carried out between 2014 and 2015 in five districts viz; Tolon, Savelugu, West Mamprusi in the Guinea savannah as well as in Bongo and Builsa North in the Sudan Savannah. Most farmers (80%) were able to mention and/or describe the key field pests and diseases often associated with groundnuts in Ghana, with termites, millipedes, white grubs and virus diseases being most frequently mentioned. Inspite of this knowledge, as many as 64% of farmers took no measures to control pests and diseases on their farms. Sampling of farms in the areas largely confirmed the farmer perceptions and responses in terms of the key members of the pest complex.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9583/

Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci of Resistance to Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus and Leaf Spots in a Recombinant Inbred Line Population of Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) from SunOleic 97R and NC94022

Authors: Khera P, Pandey MK, Wang H, Feng S, Qiao L, Culbreath AK, Kale S, Wang J, Holbrook CC, Zhuang W, Varshney RK and Guo B

Published: 2016, PLOS ONE, 11 (7): 01-17. ISSN 1932-6203

Abstract: We developed a recombinant inbred line population from the cross between SunOleic 97R and NC94022, named as the S-population. An improved genetic linkage map was developed for the S-population with 248 marker loci and a marker density of 5.7 cM/loci. This genetic map was also compared with the physical map of diploid progenitors of tetraploid peanut, resulting in an overall co-linearity of about 60% with the average co-linearity of 68% for the A sub-genome and 47% for the B sub-genome.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9585/

Global Resources of Genetic Diversity in Peanut

Authors: Barkley NA, Upadhyaya HD, Liao B and Holbrook CC

Published: 2016, Peanuts: Genetics, Processing, and Utilization. Academic Press and AOCS Press, pp. 67-109. ISBN 9781630670382

Abstract: Peanut or groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an annual herb, with geocarpic fruits, and an indeterminate growth habit. It is classified as a legume in the plant family Fabaceae. Carl Linneaus first described the cultivated species in 1753, as A. hypogaea which was derived from the word “arachos” meaning a weed and “hypogaea” which means an underground chamber (Stalker and Simpson, 1995). Cultivated peanut can be classified into two subspecies, fastigiata and hypogaea, based on the presence or absence of floral axes on the main stem. They can be further divided into six botanical varieties (subspecies hypogaea: var. hirsuta, and var. hypogaea; subspecies fastigiata: var. aequatoriana, var. fastigiata, var. peruviana, and var. vulgaris) based on a range of morphological characteristics such as growth habit, trichomes, and pod morphology.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9586/

 

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2014

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Aug:  01 08 14 22 28
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2013

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2009

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