Feature Stories

26
May

Mobile App to Help Farmers Overcome Crop Damage

An innovative multi-lingual plant disease and pest diagnostic ‘Plantix’ app, available on farmer’s mobile phones helps them identify pests, diseases and suggests remedies. The app was launched by the Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh N...
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New publications

Probiotic Potential Streptomyces Species From The Grains Of Pearl Millet (Pennisetum Glaucum)   

Authors:  Kunchala R, Durgalla P, Banerjee R, Mazumdar SD, Srinivas V and Gopalakrishnan S

Published: 2017. African Journal of Microbiology Research, 11 (14): 553-559

Abstract: The present investigation was conducted to characterize probiotic properties of actinomycete(s) isolated from pearl millet flour and batter samples. A media selective and specific were used for isolation, actinomycetes isolation agar (AIA), and the most prominent actinomycete (found abundantly in the AIA plate) was isolated and maintained on AIA slants at 4°C for further investigation. This study indicated that the selected Streptomyces spp. could be used to develop new probiotic foods.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9959/

Development and Evaluation of a High Density Genotyping ‘Axiom_Arachis’ Array with 58 K SNPs for Accelerating Genetics and Breeding in Groundnut

Authors: Pandey MK, Agarwal G, Kale SM, Clevenger J,
Nayak SN, Sriswathi M, Chitikineni A, Chavarro C, Chen X,
Upadhyaya HD, Vishwakarma MK, Leal-Bertioli S, Liang X, Bertioli DJ, Guo B, Jackson SA, Ozias-Akins P and Varshney RK

Published: 2017. Scientific Reports, 7:1-10

Abstract: In this paper we report the development of a high-density SNP array ‘Axiom_Arachis’ with 58 K SNPs and its utility in groundnut genetic diversity study. In this context, from a total of 163,782 SNPs derived from DNA resequencing and RNA-sequencing of 41 groundnut accessions and wild diploid ancestors, a total of 58,233 unique and informative SNPs were selected for developing the array. In addition to cultivated groundnuts (Arachis hypogaea), fair representation was kept for other diploids (A. duranensis, A. stenosperma, A. cardenasii, A. magna and A. batizocoi). Genotyping of the groundnut ‘Reference Set’ containing 300 genotypes identified 44,424 polymorphic SNPs and genetic diversity analysis provided in-depth insights into the genetic architecture of this material.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9960/

Prioritizing investments for climate-smart agriculture: Lessons learned from Mali

Authors: Andrieu N, Sogoba B, Zougmore R, Howland F, Samake O, Bonilla-Findji O, Lizarazo M, Nowak A, Dembele C and Corner-Dolloff C

Published: 2017. Agricultural Systems, 154: 13-24

Abstract: This paper presents the process, results, and lessons learned from a yearlong pilot of the Climate-Smart Agriculture Prioritization Framework (CSA-PF) in Mali. Key national and international stakeholders participated in the co-development and prioritization of two CSA portfolios and related action plans for the Malian Sudanese zone. Initial steps towards outcomes of the process include inclusion of prioritized CSA practices in ongoing development projects and prompting discussion of modifications of future calls for agricultural development proposals by regional donors.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9962/

Heterosis for Nitrogen Fixation and Seed Yield and Yield Components in Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

Authors: Girma N, Mekibib F, Fikre A, Keneni G, Ganga Rao NVPR, Gaur PM and Ojiewo CO

Published: 2017. International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research, 4 (2):50-57

Abstract: This study was conducted to estimate the magnitude of heterosis for nitrogen fixation and yield and yield associated traits in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). Six F1 crosses obtained from crossing of four parents (two nodulated and non-nodulated) in a half diallel fashion were evaluated in 2014/15 season in lath house using Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with two replications at Debre Zeit Agricultural Research Center. Significant (P<0.05) differences were exhibited among entries for all traits studied. Considering all traits, relative to the mid parent (MPH), better parent (BPH) and standard heterosis (SH) in percent ranged from 0.009 to 59.8, 0.009 to 39.9 and 0.009 to 58.8, respectively. The highest degrees of MPH were noted for nodule dry weight and of BPH and SH were noted for number of pods per plant, while the lowest was observed for grain yield (0.009).

http://oar.icrisat.org/9964/

Bioacoustics of Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) on Phaseolus vulgaris (Fabaceae)

Authors:  Njoroge AW, Affognon H, Mutungi C, Richter U, Hensel O, Rohde B and Mankin RW

Published: 2017. Florida Entomologist, 100 (1): 109-115

Abstract: We considered a hypothesis that readily available acoustic detection devices can be used to detect larvae and adults in stored beans. Laboratory experiments were conducted in an anechoic chamber to characterize the sounds of movement and feeding and estimate whether they could be distinguished from background noise in storage environments. The larvae produced low-amplitude insect sound impulses frequently occurring in trains (bursts) of 2 or more impulses (mean = 3.6). The adults produced lower-amplitude impulses, although at a higher rate than the larvae, and there were significantly fewer impulses per burst.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9965/

Returns to research and outreach for integrated pest management of western flower thrips infesting French bean and tomato in Kenya

Authors: Mujuka EA, Affognon H, Muriithi BW, Subramanian S, Irungu P and Mburu J

Published: 2017, International Journal of Tropical Insect Science, 37(2): 1-11

Abstract: This study was conducted to estimate the potential benefits of the effectiveness of the icipe-developed strategy for control of western flower thrips before dissemination of the technology in Kenya, using the economic surplus model. We calculated the benefit–cost ratio, the Net Present Value (NPV) and the Internal Rate of Return (IRR) using Cost–Benefit Analysis (CBA). Assuming a maximum conservative adoption rate of 1% and a 10% discount rate for the base deterministic scenario, the NPV of the research was estimated at US$2.2 million, with an IRR of 23% and a BCR of 2.46.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9966/

Advances in crop insect modelling methods—Towards a whole system approach

Authors:  Tonnang HEZ, Hervé BDB, Biber-Freudenberger L, Salifu D, Subramanian S, Ngowi VB, Guimapi RYA, Anani B, Kakmeni FMM, Affognon H, Niassy S, Landmann T, Ndjomatchoua FT, Pedro SA, Johansson T, Tanga CM, Nana P, Fiaboe KM, Mohamed SF, Maniania NK, Nedorezov LV, Ekesi S and Borgemeister C

Published: 2017. Ecological Modelling, 354: 88-103

Abstract: This paper presents a summary of decades of advances in insect population dynamics, phenology models, distribution and risk mapping. Existing challenges on the modelling of insects are listed; followed by innovations in the field. New approaches include artificial neural networks, cellular automata (CA) coupled with fuzzy logic (FL), fractal, multi-fractal, percolation, synchronization and individual/agent-based approaches.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9967/

Kenya public weather processed by the Global Yield Gap Atlas project

Authors:  Groot HD, Adimo O, Claessens L, Wart JV, van Bussel LGJ, Grassini P, Wolf J, Guilpart N, Boogaard H, van Oort PAJ, Yang HS, van Ittersum MK and Cassman KG

Published: 2017. Open Data Journal for Agricultural Research, 3: 16-18

Abstract: The Global Yield Gap Atlas project (GYGA – http://yieldgap.org) has undertaken a yield gap assessment following the protocol recommended by van Ittersum et al. (2013). One part of the activities consists of collecting and processing weather data as an input for crop simulation models in sub-Saharan African countries including Kenya. This publication covers daily weather data for 12 locations in Kenya for the years 1998-2012. The project looked for good quality weather data in areas where crops are pre-dominantly grown. As locations with good public weather data are sparse in Africa, the project developed a method to generate bias corrected weather data from a combination of observed data and other external weather data. observed weather data.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9968/

Quantifying pearl millet response to high temperature stress: thresholds, sensitive stages, genetic variability and relative sensitivity of pollen and pistil

Authors:  Djanaguiraman M, Perumal R, Ciampitti IA, Gupta SK and Prasad PVV

Published: 2017. Plant, Cell & Environment: 1-15

Abstract: The objectives were to (1) quantify high temperature (HT) stress impacts at different growth stages (season long, booting to seed-set and booting to maturity) on various yield components; (2) identify the most sensitive stage(s) to short episodes of HT stress during reproductive development; (3) understand the genetic variations for HT stress tolerance based on cardinal temperatures for pollen germination; and (4) determine relative sensitivity of pollen and pistil to HT stress and associated tolerance or susceptible mechanisms in pearl millet.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9969/

Interaction of Nitric Oxide with Phytohormones under Drought Stress

Authors:  Adimulam SS, Bhatnagar-Mathur P and Parankusam S

Published: 2017. Journal of Plant Studies, 6 (1): 58-61

Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in resistance to various plant stresses and hence gaining increasing attention from plant researchers. NO mediate various abiotic and biotic stresses in plants including drought stress. However, it is still unclear about the actual involvement of NO in drought stress responses at a whole plant level. Whether NO act alone or in coherence with other phytohormones and signaling molecules is an open question till now. Here we summarized the interaction of NO with the well-known phytohormones in coping with the drought stress.

http://oar.icrisat.org/9958/

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