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Video

Preserving seeds for posterity.

Dr Hari D Upadhyaya, Head, Genebank, ICRISAT, highlights the importance of conserving crop seeds for the future generations. He was recently awarded the Crop Trust Legacy Award for his work on crop diversity. Read more here about his work in the area of preservation of important crop seeds.

New Projects

Title: GeoNutrition

Funder: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation through The University of Nottingham

Research Program: Eastern and Southern Africa

PrincipaI Investigator: Tilahun Amede

Duration: 1 Mar 2018 – 31 Mar 2021

Title: Building Resiliency and Adaptation to Climate Extreme and Disasters-X (BRACED-X)

Funder: DFID through Blumont International

Research Program: Western and Central Africa

PrincipaI Investigator: Birhanu Zemadim Birhanu

Duration: 1 Mar 2018 – 30 Apr 2019

Title: Enabling Value Chains to Create Sustainable Income for Vulnerable People in Crop-Livestock Systems of Burkina Faso and Niger

Funder: USAID/University of Florida Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Livestock Systems

Research Program: Western and Central Africa

PrincipaI Investigator: V Bado

Duration: 26 Jan 2018 – 30 Sep 2020

Title: DST-ICRISAT Center of Excellence on Climate Change Research for Plant Protection (CoE-CCRPP): Pest and disease management for climate change adaptation

Funder: Department of Science and Technology, Govt. of India

Research Program: Asia

PrincipaI Investigator: Mamta Sharma

Duration: 1 Apr 2018 – 31 Mar 2023

Title: Facilitating change in soil fertility management

Funder: Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH

Research Program: Eastern and Southern Africa

PrincipaI Investigator: Tilahun Amede

Duration: 1 Mar 2018 – 28 Feb 2021

Title: Technologies for African Agricultural Transformation (TAAT)

Funder: African Development Fund through IITA

Research Program: Western and Central Africa

PrincipaI Investigator: Ramadjita Tabo

Duration: 19 Feb 2018 – 30 Nov 2021

New Publications

QTLs for resistance to Fusarium wilt and Ascochyta blight in a recombinant inbred population of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

Authors: Garg T, Mallikarjuna BP, Thudi M, Samineni S, Singh S, Sandhu JS, Kaur L, Singh I, Sirari A, Basandrai AK, Basandrai D, Varshney RK and Gaur PM

Published: 2018, Euphytica, 214(3) (45). pp. 1-11. ISSN 0014-2336

Abstract: Fusarium wilt (FW; caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris) and Ascochyta blight (AB; caused by Ascochyta rabiei) are two major biotic stresses that cause significant yield losses in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). In order to identify the genomic regions responsible for resistance to FW and AB, 188 recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross JG 62 × ICCV 05530 were phenotyped for reaction to FW and AB under both controlled environment and field conditions. The QTLs and linked markers identified in this study can be utilized for enhancing the FW and AB resistance in elite cultivars using marker-assisted backcrossing.

http://oar.icrisat.org/10426/

Plant vigour QTLs co-map with an earlier reported QTL hotspot for drought tolerance while water saving QTLs map in other regions of the chickpea genome

Authors: Sivasakthi K, Thudi M, Tharanya M, Kale SM, Kholova J, Halime MH, Jaganathan D, Baddam R, Thirunalasundari T, Gaur PM, Varshney RK and Vadez V

Published: 2018, BMC Plant Biology, 18(1) (29). pp. 1-18. ISSN 1471-2229

Abstract: Terminal drought stress leads to substantial annual yield losses in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). Adaptation to water limitation is a matter of matching water supply to water demand by the crop. Therefore, harnessing the genetics of traits contributing to plant water use, i.e. transpiration rate and canopy development dynamics, is important to design crop ideotypes suited to a varying range of water limited environments. With an aim of identifying genomic regions for plant vigour (growth and canopy size) and canopy conductance traits, 232 recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between ICC 4958 and ICC 1882, were phenotyped at vegetative stage under well-watered conditions using a high throughput phenotyping platform (LeasyScan).

http://oar.icrisat.org/10427/

Harvesting plant and microbial biodiversity for sustainably enhanced food security

Authors: Laplaze L, Sparvoli F, Masmoudi K and Hash CT

Published: 2018, Frontiers in Plant Science, 9 (42). pp. 1-27. ISSN 1664-462X

Abstract: According to the United Nations, the World population will reach 9 billion by 2050, with the majority of this growth occurring in developing countries. More than half of global population growth is expected to occur in Africa. On the other hand, one in nine of the World’s population suffers from chronic hunger, the vast majority of which live in developing countries (FAO et al., 2015). We therefore need to find new and sustainable solutions to feed this increasing population and alleviate the predicted negative impact of global changes on crop production. This e-Book summarize current research to improve food security and livelihoods in rural communities, reduce vulnerability, increase resilience, and mitigate land degradation in developing countries…

http://oar.icrisat.org/10428/

Effect of input credit on smallholder farmers’ output and income

Authors: Iddrisu A, Ansah IGK and Nkegbe PK

Published: 2018, Agricultural Finance Review, 78 (1). pp. 98-115. ISSN 0002-1466

Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of input credit on smallholder farmers’ output and income using Masara N’Arziki support project in Northern Ghana.

A cross-sectional primary data set was used to estimate the effect of project participation on farm output, yield and income using propensity score matching (PSM) methods. The findings are that project participation is skewed towards experienced farmers with big-sized households and farms. The effect of project on outcomes is somewhat unsatisfactory in the sense that participation only raises output and yield, but not income.

http://oar.icrisat.org/10429/

Ecology and genomics of an important crop wild relative as a prelude to agricultural innovation

Authors: von Wettberg EJB, Chang PL, Başdemir F, Carrasquila-Garcia N, et al.

Published: 2018, Nature Communications, 9 (1) (649). pp. 1-13. ISSN 2041-1723

Abstract: Domesticated species are impacted in unintended ways during domestication and breeding. Changes in the nature and intensity of selection impart genetic drift, reduce diversity, and increase the frequency of deleterious alleles. Such outcomes constrain our ability to expand the cultivation of crops into environments that differ from those under which domestication occurred. We address this need in chickpea, an important pulse legume, by harnessing the diversity of wild crop relatives. We document an extreme domestication-related genetic bottleneck and decipher the genetic history of wild populations.

http://oar.icrisat.org/10431/

Achieving sustainable cultivation of grain legumes. Volume 2: Improving cultivation of particular grain legumes

Authors: Sivasankar S, Bergvinson D, Gaur PM, Kumar S, Beebe S and Tamo M

Published: 2018, Burleigh Dodds Series in Agricultural Science (36). Burleigh Dodds Science Publishing Limited, Cambridge, UK. ISBN 9781786761408

Abstract: This book contains 15 chapters assessing key research on particular types of grain legumes, such as common beans, chickpeas, lentils, soyabeans, groundnuts, cowpeas, faba beans and pigeon peas. Information on the development of improved cultivars as well as improvements in cultivation techniques of these grain legumes are also presented.

http://oar.icrisat.org/10432/

Science & Technology and Startups in Agriculture

Author: Bergvinson D

Published: 2018, In: National Conference on Agriculture 2022 – Doubling Farmers’ Income, February 19 – 20, 2018, New Delhi, India.

Abstract: The Indian economy is largely agrarian, with around 55%of the population dependent for their livelihoods on agriculture and allied sectors that generate 15% Gross Value Added (GVA) (Gol 2017a). Indian farmers are vulnerable to impacts of climate change, water scarcity and land degradation. In addition, increasing fragmentation of holdings, extreme weather events, rising input costs and post-harvest losses pose an enormous challenge to sustaining agricultural growth. There has been considerable expansion and change in the research and extension system but the key questions remain: ‘Is this sufficient to Double Farmers ’Incomes by 2022? Is there a need for a different mindset to ensure agriculture science empowers farmers to reach their full economic potential? Can such be achieved while delivering nutrition to the nation as well as within the ecological boundaries of India’s natural resources?

http://oar.icrisat.org/10438/

Killing the goose? The value chain for sorghum beer in Kenya

Authors: Orr A

Published: 2018, Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, 8 (1). pp. 34-53. ISSN 2044-0839

Abstract: The decision by the Government of Kenya in 2013 to increase tax revenue by imposing excise duty of 50 percent on sorghum beer resulted in economic losses for smallholders, the brewery, and the government itself because it effectively killed the value chain. In 2015, the government reversed the policy decision and reduced excise duty to 10 percent. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of this policy decision on the value chain, adaptation by growers and the brewery, and the rationale for this policy change and its reversal. The author shows how the nature of politics in Kenya exposed the value chain to endogenous shocks as the result of conflicts between interacting agents, where smallholder farmer organizations were important for successful adaptation.

http://oar.icrisat.org/10440/

Introduction to special issue: smallholder value chains as complex adaptive systems

Authors: Orr A and Donovan J

Published: 2018, Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, 8 (1). pp. 2-13. ISSN 2044-0839

Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new conceptual framework for smallholder value chains based on complex adaptive systems. The authors review the application of the framework to three case studies and explore their implications. The authors reflect on the value of a framework based on complex adaptive systems compared to alternative frameworks. The authors argue that the dynamics of smallholder value chains have received insufficient attention.

By focusing on these dynamics and on the capacity for adaptation among value chain actors the framework provides a new perspective on smallholder value chains. Complex adaptive systems provide a useful framework for analyzing value chain dynamics.

http://oar.icrisat.org/10441/

Smallholder value chains as complex adaptive systems: a conceptual framework

Authors: Orr A, Donovan J and Stoian D

Published: 2018, Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, 8 (1). pp. 14-33. ISSN 2044-0839

Abstract: Smallholder value chains are dynamic, changing over time in sudden, unpredictable ways as they adapt to shocks. Understanding these dynamics and adaptation is essential for these chains to remain competitive in turbulent markets. This paper develops an expanded conceptual framework to understand value chain performance based on the theory of complex adaptive systems. The framework combines seven common properties of complex systems: time, uncertainty, sensitivity to initial conditions, endogenous shocks, sudden change, interacting agents and adaptation. The authors outline how the framework can be used to ask new research questions and analyze case studies in order to improve our understanding of the development of smallholder value chains and their capacity for adaptation.

http://oar.icrisat.org/10442/

Archives

2016

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May: 06 13 20  27
Apr:  01 07 15 22  29
Mar:  04 11 18  24
Feb:  05 12 19  26
Jan:  08 15 22 29

2015

Dec: 04 11 18 24 31
Nov: 06 13 20 27
Oct:  01 09 16 23 30
Sep:  04 11 18 24
Aug:  07 14 21 28
Jul:  03 10 17 24 31
Jun:  05 12 19 26
May:  01 08 15 22 29
Apr:  03 10 17 24
Mar:  06 13 20 27
Feb:  06 13 20 27
Jan:  02 09 16 23 30

2014

Dec:  05 12 19 26
Nov:  07 14 21 28
Oct:  01 10 17 24 31
Sep:  05 12 19 26
Aug:  01 08 14 22 28
Jul:  04 11 18 25
Jun:  06 13 20 27
May:  02 09 16 23 30
Apr:  04 11 18 25
Mar:  07 14 21 28
Feb:  07 14 21 28
Jan:  03 10 17 24 31

2013

Dec:  06 13 20 27
Nov:  01 08 15 22 29
Oct:   04 11 18 25
Sep:  06  13 20 27
Aug:  02 08 16 23 30
July:  05 12 19 26
Jun:  07 14 21 28
May:  03 10 17 24 31
Apr:  05 12 19 26
Mar:  01 08 15 22 29
Feb:  01 08 15 22
Jan:  04 11 18 25

2012

Dec:  07 14 21 28
Nov:  02 09 16 23 30
Oct:  05 12 19 26
Sep:  07 14 21 28
Aug:  03 10 17 24 31
July:  06 13 20 27
Jun:  01 08 15 22 29
May:  04 11 18 25
Apr:  06 13 20 27
Mar:  02 09 16 23 30
Feb:  03 10 17 24
Jan:  06 13 20 27

2011

Dec:  02 09 16 23 30
Nov:  04 11 18 25
Oct:  07 14 21 28
Sep:  02 09 16 23 30
Aug:  05 12 19 26
July:  01 08 15 22 29
Jun:  03 10 17 24
May:  06 13 20 27
APR:  01 08 15 21 29
MAR:  04 11 18 25
Feb:  04 11 18 25
Jan:  07 14 21 28

2010

Dec:  03 10 17 24 31
Nov:  04 12 19 26 
Oct:  01 08 15 22 29
Sep:  03 09 17 24
Aug:  06 13 20 27
Jul:  02 09 16 23 30
Jun:  04 11 18 25
May:  07 14 21 28
Apr:  01 09 16 23 30 
Mar:  05 12 19 26
Feb:  05 15 19 26
Jan:  08 15 22 29

2009

Sep 7 11 18 25
Oct:  01 09 16 23 30
Nov:  06 13 20 27
Dec:  04 11 18 24 31

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